Mutant City Blues: Season 1

Mr. Nobody

Episode 2

Once Jarred reformed, Detectives Sarantos and Bolifant took the time to interview him in the HCIU’s Boom Room and try to understand his motivation behind the crime, and determine if he understood his actions at the time of commission. At first listless, repeated questioning shows signs of memory loss and confusion. At the height of the interview, in an effort to remember, he remembered seeing “A disemboweled woman, all emptied out, floating behind him.,” When pressed for more information about who, Jarred announced that it had been The Anthrophage – the real killer had never been caught, and was still at large. According to the perp, the Anthrophage had tried tor recruit Jarred, which was why he tried to have himself arrested.

Following their conversation with Jarred, the detectives paid a visit to Dr. Jillian Wortmann, the psychiatrist who had been working with Jarred at the free clinic in Burien. Dr. Wortmann and Det. Sarantos hit things off quickly, and she confides in him that she doesn’t have time enough in the day to see, let alone give attention to all of the patients that come to see her. She mentioned that Jared was not an ideal patient – missing some appointments, and showing up for others up to a week early. As she indicated in Jarred’s file, she feels that Jarred’s depression is his original disorder, and the schizophrenia had a later on-set. She also confided in the Detectives that Jarred admitted things really went downhill for him about 2 years earlier, but that she had no details other than that. She could npt recall Jarred ever mentioning the Anthrophage during his sessions in the past.

Dr. David radioed the team as they were returning to their cars and let them know that Jarred’s EMAT Protocols returned and confirmed what the team already knew: that Jarred was the subject of frequent, ongoing mental influence.

Both detectives took the time to review the closed case file on the Anthrophage Murders, in an effort to re-familiarize themselves with the case. After review, they headed to Issaquah, and met with the former lead detective on the case, Vince Wood.

Now retired, Det. Wood has used the proceeds from selling the Anthrophage story and opened an Irish-esque bar – Michael’s Shield – that caters to cops from around the Greater Seattle area. At first, eager to help fellow badges, Det. Wood becomes defensive when talk turns to the idea of the Anthrophage getting away. While Waldo MacLagan never underwent an EMAT protocol (because the procedure hadn’t yet been developed), Wood has no qualms admitting that he knew the guy was guilty, even the cases that MacLagan hadn’t confessed to were clearly his – occurring in the same hunting ground, with the same M.O. Despite multiple opportunities, Wood stresses, MacLagan never talked about the murders other than to confess, and even that was limited. If he spoke to anyone, it wasn’t outside of prison.

The next day, the detectives took the long drive out to Kane Correctional Facility to meet with the architect of MacLagan’s death – the murderer Leonard Wayne Lennard. Before meeting with Lennard, they talk to the warden of the facility, Tamara Carrera. Warden Carrera is standoffish, and sees little good for her or the prison if the investigation points out that they were negligent in not preventing MacLagan’s death. While she had little contact with him, Warden Tamara will admit that MacLagan was strongly suspected (though never convicted) of causing a guard’s arm to burst into flames. MacLagan himself denied having spontaneous combustion among his powers, and the flames on the guards arm quickly died out leaving only minor burns.

The detectives meet with Lennard in an interrogation room, with armed guards watching over the proceedings and the subject in both wrist and ankle chains. He is eager to discuss his crimes, and proud of the fact that they locked him in with “the supervillains” despite his own lack of powers. While he freely admits to having killed three men in a bar brawl, armed with a pool cue and a glass ashtray, he is far more eager to talk about his connection to fame, in the form of MacLagan.

Lennard discusses how he had to wage a long campaign to get close to MacLagan – beginning with getting himself assigned to cleaning crews in the isolation ward where MacLagan had been housed. As they became friends, Lennard tried to get MacLagan to open up about the Anthrophage murders, but he said the MacLagan didn’t seem to remember them very well. When he did talk about them, it tended to be in the third person, as though it were someone else doing the deed, and he only watching.

When pushed about why he killed MacLagan, he admits that the final straw was MacLagan’s constant whinging about how the crimes had so disappointed his mother. While he’d told the police and reporters that his mother had died, the truth was that she had moved and changed her name so as not to get dragged down into the investigation and its aftermath. MacLagan had even admitted to Lennard that he wanted to find a way for her to visit without revealing her identity. Lennard pointed out that he hates a mama’s boy most of all, and the sharp-end of a toothbrush was all that MacLagan deserved.

On the drive back to Seattle that evening, the detectives are re-routed to Mercer Island and the residence of wine merchant Linnette Rose, 78 Europa Drive. While investigating the crime scene, which had been discovered by a pizza delivery driver early in the evening, the detectives find Linnette’s iPad, which has her scheduled to meet an importer named Corrina Giesler at her home that evening. In addition to the signs of webbing fixed t othe wall, there are also copious amounts of blood soaking into the expensive white carpet, while on the wall as drawn a familiar Devouring Smiley Face, and the words SEQUEL TIME.

Glued to the mantle with another splotch of webbing is a copy of the Seattle Times article detailing the incident near Columbia Center. In the article, Detecives Sarantos’ and Bolifant’s names have been highlighted with blood.

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